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Carolina Anole

The lizard in this photo is a Carolina Anole.  I took this photo with a Canon Rebel T4i and a Canon 100mm Macro lens.  More information about the Carolina Anole  can be found in one of my earlier post called the Carolina Anole The American Chameleon linked to below. This post discusses how the Carolina Anole is able to change it’s color to blend in to its surroundings, as general information about the Carolina Anole.    http://66.147.244.206/~lastmil5/2013/10/29/carolina-anole-the-american-chameleon

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Eastern Fence Lizard

The Eastern Fence Lizard  scientific name Sceloporus Undulatusis is  among the biggest Lizards Found In North Carolina.  The Eastern Fence Lizard ranges from 4-7.5-7 inches long. The Eastern Fence Lizard spend a lot of time in the trees which is how they got the nickname of the Pine Lizard.  The Eastern Fence Lizard can be found from mid Florida to Upstate New York and as far West as Northern Texas and  as far west as Colorado. Fence lizards can live to be up to five years old. The males can be distinguished from the Females by the presence of Blue Spots on the Lizards underbelly. Typically males also differ in color from the females the males are typically brown in color while the females are typically Grey with horizontal black stripes on their blacks.

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Sources:

http://www.nwf.org/wildlife/wildlife-library/amphibians-reptiles-and-fish/eastern-fence-lizard.aspx

http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Sceloporus_undulatus/

Honeybee on a flower

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This is a photo of a Honeybee on a flower. I took this photo with a Canon Rebel T4i and a Canon 100mm Macro lens.

Bullfrog on a Log

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This is a photo of an American Bullfrog out in the small pond behind my house. This Frog on this branch is a female you can tell because the Frogs Tympanic Membrane which is the Frogs Eardrum, which the circular indention below the Frogs eye. In females the membrane is smaller than the Frogs eye. In a male Bullfrog the Tympanic Membrane is nearly twice as big as the Frogs eye. This photo was taken with a Canon 100-400mm lens and Canon Rebel T4i.

American Bullfrog

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This is a photo of an American Bullfrog out in the pond behind my house. This photo was taken with a Canon Rebel T4i and Canon 100-400mm lens.

Bullfrog on a log

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This is a photo of an American Bullfrog on a log. A Bullfrog with its reflection moving in the ripples of the water is a beautiful sight. I took this photo with a Canon Rebel T4i and Canon 100-400mm lens.

American Bullfrog on a log

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An American Bullfrog and its reflection over the water is a truly beautiful sight. In addition to photography lately I have been working on making some nature based relaxation and meditation videos. The video below shows the reflection of the bullfrog moving with the water. Both the photo above and the video below were made with a Canon Rebel T4i and a Canon 100-400mm lens.

Copperhead (Pit Viper)

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This is a photo of a Copperhead. The Copperhead is a Venomous snake found all over the Eastern Half of the United States. The Copperhead is found all throughout the eastern half of the United States, the Copperhead can be found from New Hampshire to Texas. The Copper head is referred to as a pit Viper Due to the heat sensing pits which are located on the sides of the snakes head between the snake’s eye and nostrils. In North Carolina there are fiver Pit Vipers, the Copperhead, Cottonmouth, Timber Rattlesnake, Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake., and Pygmy Rattlesnake. Pit Vipers such as Copperheads can see both in the infrared and the normal spectrum. These heat sensing ports give Pit Vipers like the Copperhead the ability to sense heat radiating off of things in the range of 5-30 Micrometres. The heat sensing abilities of Pit Viper snakes is so precise that even blind Rattle Snakes are able to strike vulnerable parts of their prey. Scientist estimate that the heat sensing abilities of Pit Vipers are at least 10 times better than the most sensitive Infrared Cameras manufacteured by humans. The ability for pit Vipers to see in Infrared allows the snakes to be able to see and hunt for prey such as field mice which are warm blooded in total darkness. The heat that a field mice gives up shows up very bright in a snakes heat vision. The heat vision in these Snakes is made possible through the utilization of heat detecting membranes located under the Snakes pits. The heat sensing membranes have about 1600 infrared receptor cells that collect infrared light. Nerves transmit the data from the heat sensing membranes to the Snakes brain for processing. The information from the Snakes heat detectors are merged with the information from the snakes eyes, which gives the snake the ability to see in infrared and the normal spectrum at the same time. I took this photo out in the backyard with a Canon 100-400mm lens and a Canon Rebel T4i.

Sources

http://www.mapoflife.org/topics/topic_312_infrared-detection-in-snakes/

http://www.mvkonnik.info/2009/03/interesting-facts-about-snakes-vision.html

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anolecarolina
The Lizard in this photo is a Carolina Anole. The Carolina Anole is referred to as the American Chameleon due to its ability to change colors. More information about Carolina Anoles and their ability to change colors can be found by clicking on the link below. I took this photo with a Canon Rebel T4i and a Canon 100-400mm lens

http://66.147.244.206/~lastmil5/2013/10/29/carolina-anole-the-american-chameleon/

American Bullfrog

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This is a photo of an American Bullfrog.. I took this photo with a Canon Rebel T4i and a Canon 100-400mm lens. Fact Frogs are Awesome.

BLUE TAILED YELLOW SKIMMER DRAGONFLY

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This is a photo of a Blue Tailed Yellow Skimmer Dragonfly. I took this photo this afternoon while I was out photographing Frogs. I took this picture with a Canon Rebel T4i and a Canon 100-400mm lens.

American Bullfrog

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This is a photo of an American Bullfrog. I took this photo with a Canon 100-400mm lens and a Canon Rebel T4i.

Painted Turtle

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This is a photo of a Painted Turtle. I took this photo with a Canon 100-400mm lens and a Canon Rebel T4i. The Painted Turtle is the most common Turtle Found in North America. It can be found from Canada to Northern Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean. The Female painted Turtle is larger than the males, male painted Turtles are have shells that are 7 inches long on average while the females can have shells 9 inches long.

Red Bellied Water Snake

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This is a photo of a Red Bellied Water Snake. The Red Bellied Water Snake is often miss identified as a Cottonmouth snake. Due to the snake having a white interior inside their mouth and has similar outward appearance as a Cottonmouth. The Red Bellied Water Snake are known to spray attackers with a bad smelling musk and bite them. The Red Bellied Water Snake is found near swamps lakes and rivers. The Red Bellied water snake eats mostly Frogs, Toads, and Salamanders. I took this photo with a Canon 100-400mm lens and a Canon Rebel T4I

Red Shouldered Hawkling

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This is a photo of a Red Shouldered Hawkling in the nest. I took this photo with a CanonRebel T4i. The Hawks are nesting near my house once again. The proper name for a baby Hawk in the nest is Eyas but I prefer the term Hawkling.

Eastern Blue Jay

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This is a photo of an Eastern Blue Jay. I took this photo with a Canon Rebel T4i and a Canon 100-400mm lens.

Set Rock Creek Falls

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This is a photo of Set Rock Creek Falls in the Pisgah National Forest located in Western North Carolina. This photo was taken with a Canon Rebel T4i and Canon 18-55mm lens.

Crabtree Falls

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This is a photo of Crabtree Falls in Western North Carolina. I took this photo with a Canon Rebel T4i and Canon 18-55mm lens.

EASTERN NEWT (NOTOPHTHALMUS VIRIDESCENS)

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The Eastern Newt, also referred to as the Red Spotted Newt ,is found all over the East Coast of the United States. The Eastern Newt is found from Canada to the Great Lakes and as far down south as Texas and Alabama. The Eastern Newt (Notophthalmus viridescens) is the only species of Salamander that is native to North Carolina that has rough skin. Eastern Newts can be found in ponds, marshland, and slow moving streams. I found this Red Spotted Salamander while I was hiking in the Black Mountain Campground in the Pisgah National Forest located in Western North Carolina. I took these photos with a Canon Rebel T4i and Canon 100mm macro lens.

sources:

http://www.bio.davidson.edu/outreach/NCWRC%20species%20profiles/Amphibians/newteastern.pdf

http://www.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/eastern_newt.htm

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Duggers Creek Falls

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This is a photo of Duggers Creek Falls, which is Located near Linville Falls in Western North Carolina. I took this photo with a Canon Rebel T4i and and Canon 18-55mm lens.

ROARING FORK FALLS PISGAH NATIONAL FOREST

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This is a photo of Roaring Fork Falls I took with a Canon Rebel T4i and Canon 18-55mm lens.

American Bullfrog

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Bullfrogs as well as other types of Frogs are very patient they will sit in the same spot for hours and wait for an insect or anything really that gets to close to the Bull Frog will stick its long sticky tongue out and try to make a meal of the insect, or anything else that gets too close the the Bullfrog. The act of a bullfrog snatching up a meal with its long tongue something that I have been trying to get some photo or video of for a while, hopefully this summer that will be something I can capture. This photo was taken with a Canon 100-400mm lens and Canon Rebel T4i.

Copes Grey Tree Frog

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The Frog in this photo is a Copes Grey Tree Frog. This photo was taken with a Canon 100mm Macro lens and Canon Rebel T4i. The Grey Tree Frog can change its color fro Grey to Green to Brown depending on the enviornment the Frog is in.

Frog Hearing

If you have ever been outside on a warm night you know just how loud Frogs and Toads can be. Frogs and Toads call to attract mates. Male Frogs and Toads call to attract females. Below is a video of an American Toad Calling to attract a mate. I took this video in a pond behind my house using a Canon 100mm macro lens and Canon Rebel T4i.


You can see in the video the Toads eardrum is the circular indention behind their eyes. You can also tell from the video that this toad calls quite loud, Frogs and Toads are able to call at upwards of 90 decibels. Frogs and Toads have quite sensitive hearing, it begs the question how do they not damage their eardrums and deafen themselves with their loud calls. Scientist have discovered that Frogs hear with both their ear drums and their lungs and a pressure system builds inside the Frog that minimizes vibrations from internal noises made by the frog. To further elaborate on this I need to talk about how a frogs ear drum works. A frogs ear drum is called a Tympanum. A frogs Tympanum works in ver much the same way that our human ear drums work. A frogs ear drum, just like a humans ear drum is a membrane that is stretched across a ring of cartilage like a snare drum that vibrates. There is rod that is connected to the ear drum , which vibrates by sounds that come at the frog.Remember from school that sound is just pressure waves. The rod sloshes around in the inner ear fluid, which causes microscopic hairs to move, which send signals to the frogs brain for interception. A frogs ear lungs also vibrate when sound waves come toward the frog, although they are less sensitive than the frogs ear drum. Some frogs like the Spring Peeper, pictured right

Spring Peeper on a Twig Copyright 2013 Last Mile Photography

Spring Peeper on a Twig Copyright 2013 Last Mile Photography


have a call that are so loud that they heard for up to one mile away. These creatures are so noisy that it is a wonder that they do not hurt their ears and deafen themselves with their own calls. Frogs have a very clever method of making sure that their own loud calls do not hurt their own hearing. In 1988 Scientist Peter Narins who is a professor at UCLA of Physiological science found have found that frogs have an internal pressure system, a closed air loop. that keeps the frogs own ear drum from vibrating excessively from its own call. Scientist have found that pressure builds between their lungs and ear drum, which then equalizes the pressure between the inner and outer surfaces of the frogs ear drum, which greatly cuts down on the vibrations that a frog experiences, from their internal calls. It is also believed that another purpose of the closed loop pressure system is so the Frogs can detect the direction a sound is coming from with its lungs so frogs can escape danger while calling. Being in the vicinity of frogs calling can subject a human to sounds so loud that they are upwards of 90 db ,which can cause discomfort and hearing loss for humans.

Sources: Holladay APril: Frogs Can Hear Without Ears. 4/26/2001. http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/science/wonderquest/2001-04-25-frog-ears.htm

American Bullfrog

This is a photo of an American Bullfrog out in the small pond behind my house. This photo was taken with a Canon 100-400mm lens and a Canon Rebel T4i.toadmating_11

Frog Eyes

Frogs due to the positioning and design of their eyes have nearly a 360 degree view. This makes up for the fact that Frogs

American bullfrog I photographed with a Canon Rebel T4i and Canon 100-400mm Lens

American bullfrog I photographed with a Canon Rebel T4i and Canon 100-400mm Lens

are not able to turn their head and look behind them like other animals can. Frogs with their nearly 360 degree of field of view make it difficult for predators to sneak up on them. Frogs also are unable to move their eyes within their eye sockets like humans and other animals can. This causes a Frog to have to turn his head to line up with its prey. Frogs cannot see while they are attacking prey, so they must have their prey lined up when they go in for the strike. Frogs are unable see their prey while they are making a strike because, when their sticky tongue comes out to snatch up an insect their eyes retract into the top of their head. Frogs are near sighted they do not see very well at a distance. Their eyes are extremely sensitive to movement if a Frogs prey does not move they will not detect it. Frogs also have excellent night vision, due to having a mirror like layer in the back of their eye called a Tapetum. The Tapetum helps Frogs reflect and collect ambient light between the back of the eye and the Frogs Cornea. Frogs also use their eyes in a rather interesting way, frogs are unable to swallow like Humans and other animals so they actually push their eyes down into their head to push their food into their stomach.

Frogs eyes come in all different colors, Frog eyes ranger from copper to bronze to gold to silver in color, to orange and red, like the Eyes of the Red Eyed Tree Frog.

Spring Peeper on a Twig Copyright 2013 Last Mile Photography

Spring Peeper on a Twig Copyright 2013 Last Mile Photography

Frogs have three different eye lids. The third eye lid of a frog is the most interesting. The third eyelid is a clear membrane, it is called a Nictitating membrane, and this eye lid helps the frog to see underwater as well as to hide from predators.

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American Toad Calling

It is Spring time here in North Carolina, and the warm weather has brought the toads back out from their burrows, and they have come out of hibernation. The American toad, as well as other frogs , have one thing on their mind after they come out of hibernation ,that is reproduction. The male toads call for the females, and the female toads select the males with the loudest calls as their mate. I took this video on the bank of a pond behind my house. Below we see a male American toad who has climbed onto the back of a female who he has attracted with his calls. When a male assumes this position it is called amplexus, which is a fancy word for mating position. As the female releases her eggs into the water in a long string ,then the male fertilizes them. I took this video and photo with a Canon Rebel T4i and Canon 100mm Macro lens. For the lighting I used a Newer CN-160 led light pod mounted to the top of my camera. Now that the weather is warm, and the frogs and toads have come back out and I am working on some documentary clips about frogs and toads of North Carolina.

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sources

http://www.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/american_toad.htm

American Bullfrog

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The Frog in this photo is an American Bullfrog. American Bullfrogs are the largest Frogs found in the United States. American Bullfrogs can measure up to 8 inches from their snout to the back of their bodies. American Bullfrogs often times sit for hours submerged in water, with all but their heads exposed, waiting for prey to come by. American Bullfrogs have a long sticky tongue that they use to snatch up prey that gets too close to them. Hopefully this Spring/Summer I will be able to either get a photograph or a video of a Bullfrog snatching up some prey with its long sticky tongue.

sources

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/amphibians/american-bullfrog/

Male Eastern Cardinal In A Tree

The bird in this photo is a Male Eastern Cardinal ,I took this photo with a Canon 100-400mm Lens and a Canon Rebel T4i. The cardinal in this photo was calling from the tree limb and and showing his tail feathers in order to attract a female.
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Southern Leopard Frogs Calling

Its Spring Time here in Central North Carolina the Frogs are back out and they are calling.   After a long hard winter we see that the Frogs are ready to reproduce.   We can see the first Southern Leopard Frog in the video’s calls were successful in attracting a Female. The video below is a video that I shot with a Neewer 160 Led light pod  and Canon RebelT4i and Canon 100mm macro lens.  My next goal is to try get some video of the illusive spring   Peepers calling.

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Eastern Blue Jay On A Tree Limb

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This is an Eastern Blue Jay in a tree taken with a Canon Rebel T4i and Canon 100-400mm lens

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Cullowee Falls

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This is a photo of Cullowhee Falls located in Cullowhee North Carolina. I took this photo with a Canon Rebel T4i and a Canon 18-55mm lens

Rainbow Falls Nantahala National Forest on the Horsepasture River

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Rainbows Falls taken with a Canon Rebel T4i and a Canon 18-55mm lens

Silver Run Falls Cashiers NC

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This is a photo of Silver Run Falls in the Nanahala National Forest. This Waterfall is just outside of Cashiers NC. I took this photo using a Canon Rebel T4i and a Canon 18-55mm lens.

The Rain Has Brought The Tree Frogs Back Out

 

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The first warm rain has brought the Tree Frogs back out of hibernation. The Frog in this photo is an American Green Tree Frog. I took this photo with a Canon Rebel T4i and Canon 100mm Macro lens. This was the last photo I was able to get before the battery in my camera died.  Hopefully in the coming days I will have time to go out and look for more Tree Frogs to photograph.

Spotted Salamander

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This is a photo of a Spotted Salamander. I took this photo in the small, shallow pond behind my house. I took this photo using a Canon Rebel T4i and a Canon 100mm Macro lens. The Spotted salamander is one of the Largest species of Salamanders found in North Carolina, the Spotted Salamander can be up to 9 inches in length. In the wild Spotted Salamanders can live to be up to 20 years old. The Spotted Salamander can be found in heavily forested areas in the Mountain and Piedmont regions of North Carolina.  The Spotted Salamander is most active at night, and Is rarely seen because it spends most of its time underground. The Spotted salamander only comes out at night to find prey, as well in the Spring when its mating season.  In my previous located below post I talked about how Spotted Salamanders lay their eggs in the early Spring in shallow pools.

sources, and more information about spotted salamander

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/amphibians/spotted-salamander/

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Spotted Salamander Laying Eggs

Spotted Salamander Laying Eggs

The spotted Salamander is a a large Salamander, it is one of the largest Salamanders found in North Carolina. The Spotted Salamander can be found all through the deciduous forest of Canada and the Eastern United States, The Spotted Salamanders can be found from Nova Scotia to Southern Georgia and as far west as Eastern Texas. The Spotted Salamander ranges in size from 5.9 inches to 9.8 inches long. The Spotted Salamander can live up to twenty years. Spotted Salamanders usually range in color from black, to grey, and to dark green, with yellow spots. Spotted Salamanders spend a lot of their time underground, and are rarely seen. The Spotted Salamander only only comes out after a rain and to look for food, at night. Spotted Salamanders diets consist of earthworms, snails, spiders, centipedes and other insects. Salamanders like other amphibians hibernate for the winter. Spotted Salamanders come out of hibernation in the early Spring to breed. I took this photo on a warm February night of 20014, after some pretty heavy rains had fallen. The photos show a female Spotted Salamander laying and attaching her eggs to a small twig underwater,in a very shallow pond behind my house. I took this photo using a Canon 100mm Macro Lens and Neewer 160 Led Light attached to my camera. After the eggs are laid Green Algae grows over the eggs to help camouflage the eggs so that Fish, and Frogs will not eat the eggs. Hopefully I can get some photos of these Eggs hatching as well as some photos of Spotted Salamanders on Dry land.

sources

http://www.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/spotted_salamander.html

http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Ambystoma_maculatum/#ec3ed98d18ef60e0569c883699bfa7bf

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/amphibians/spotted-salamander/

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This Warm Weather Has Brought My Amphibious Friends Back Out

This Warm Weather Has Brought My Amphibious Friends Back Out

This warm weather as of late has brought my Amphibian Friends back out. The Frog in this photo is a Carpenter Frog. This is the first photo I have taken with my new Canon 100mm Macro Lens.

Ive also been making progress on my new website for Last Mile Photography, http://www.lastmilephotography.com

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Male Eastern Cardinal in a tree

Male Eastern Cardinal in a tree

This is a photo of a Male Cardinal in a Tree, I took this photo with a Canon Rebel and a Canon 100-400mm Lens

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Male Cardinal in an Icy Tree

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I took this photo today with my new Canon 100-400mm lens

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Junco in the Snow

I took this photo of this Junco in the snow, with my new Canon 100-400mm Camera Lens, im so excited that I finally saved up enough to afford a Canon 100-400mm lens and a Canon 100mm Macro Lens. Also ive been doing more work on my website www.lastmilephotography.com So far we’ve gotten about 5 inches of Sleet and snow here in Fuquay-Varina in Central NC. Work is cancelled tomorrow so Im going to spend all day looking for birds and other creatures to photograph in the snow.

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This is a Junco in this winter storm Pax Pounding North Carolina as we speak.

How Honeybees Are Able To Fly

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Honey Bee’s (Apis scientific name) can flap their wings as fast as 230 times per second, and fly at speeds of up to 15 miles per hour. Scientist have found out that, Honey- bee’s do not regulate the frequency of their wing beats, when they are carry loads of Pollen. You would think bee’s would flap faster when they were carrying more weight, Instead they just increase the arc of their wing beats, and flip their wings over upside down. The Honey-bee makes a 90 degree arc in the upstroke of its wing, the flips its wing upside down at the end of the wing’s downstroke, which allows the wing to flap back through the wake from the previous stroke, and create more lift. This allows the bee to use the air stirred up in the previous stoke for lift. This gives the bee two times more lift than it would have otherwise. (Flight of the Honeybee) This photo of a Honeybee I took back when I was a student at Western Carolina University. This is one of my first wildlife photos, I took this back last Spring when I was first getting into Wildlife Photography. I cannot wait until this Spring When the HonyeBee’s BumbleBee’s and other Insects come back out of hibernation. For this photo I used my Canon Rebel T4i with a Canon 55-250 telephoto lens with a Shutter speed of 1/4000th of a second.

works cited

http://blogs.bu.edu/bioaerial2012/2012/10/04/flight-of-the-honeybee/

Caltech Media Relations

http://www.caltech.edu/content/deciphering-mystery-bee-flight

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Spring Peeper Chillin on a Twig

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Hello Friends, I moved my lastmilephotography.wordpress.com to my own domain name. http://www.lastmilephotography.com. Im still working on getting all of the issues out of this website, as well as continuing to work on the layout and design of this website, I have a lot of big plans for this website. I cannot wait until the Spring when all of the Frogs and Toads come back out of hiding, by this Spring I will have a Canon 100mm Macro Lens, which I am very excited about. The Frog in this photo is a Spring Peeper, the Spring Peeper is one of 15 species of Tree Frogs found here in North Carolina. I took this photo with my Canon Rebel T4i and Canon 55-250 telephoto lens. Hopefully by the end of this summer I will accomplish my goal of photographing all of the Frog species found in North Carolina.

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Carolina Anole showing his Dewlap

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This is a photo of a carolina Anole exposing his Dewlap. The Dewlap is the red flap that the Lizard has underneath his throat. The Dewlap serves 2 purposes the Dewlap is designed to scare off predators by making the Lizard look bigger than he really is. The other purpose that a Lizards Dewlap serves is to attract and impress the females. The bigger and more vibrant the Anoles Dewlap is the better chance he has of finding a mate.

This Anole is on the Fence of my neighbors pool. I took this photo using a Canon Rebel T4i and a Canon 55-250mm Lens, this last July.

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Carolina Anole On A Tree Limb

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This is a photo of a Carolina Anole on a Tree Limb. I took this photo with a Canon Rebel T4i and a Sigma 70-300mm Lens.

Carpenter Frog

This is a Carpenter Frog that I photographed in the Pond Behind my house. The warm weather we had 2 weeks ago brought the Frogs out of hibernation briefly. I cannot wait until Spring when all of the Frogs will come back out of hibernation. Soon I will buying me a Canon 100mm Macro lens, which will allow me to get even closer up photos of Frogs, Lizards, Butterflies, Bumblebee’s and other creatures. This photo was taken with a Canon Rebel T4i and Sigma 70-300mm DG Macro Lens.

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American Green Tree Frog

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This is an American Green Tree Frog. This is my favorite species of New World Tree Frog. In the link below I discuss the equipment I use to take photos like the American Green Tree Frog pictured above. I plan when the weather warms up to do a video on photographing Frogs.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly

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The Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly is one of the most common butterflies found in the Eastern United States. This butterfly can be seen From Spring to Fall the Eastern Swallowtail Ranges from southern maine to Eastern Colorado down to Southern Texas

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